About Me

I am a teacher with over 25 years of experience working with children aged 4 to 15.

I have supported children with mild to moderate needs and children who have a processing disorder, autism, dyslexia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia.
2 Reviews

£100.00 Per Hour

minimum 1.5 hour sessions READ THIS TUTOR'S REVIEWS HERE

Specialist Experience and Skills

How I work

To be successful, children must believe that their knowledge can and will grow. I always do everything I can to ensure that the child can listen, be persistent, and achieve.

I believe in making learning a positive experience, so I ensure that each learning challenge is achievable.

When I first start working with a new pupil, I like to find out their exact learning level. I then create a personalised lesson plan that is designed to address your child’s knowledge gaps. In this way, your child can grow from their current level and learn at their own pace, with no peer pressu... Read More
How I work

To be successful, children must believe that their knowledge can and will grow. I always do everything I can to ensure that the child can listen, be persistent, and achieve.

I believe in making learning a positive experience, so I ensure that each learning challenge is achievable.

When I first start working with a new pupil, I like to find out their exact learning level. I then create a personalised lesson plan that is designed to address your child’s knowledge gaps. In this way, your child can grow from their current level and learn at their own pace, with no peer pressure. A one-to-one approach can be key to advance your child’s learning.

My specialist skills and experience are teaching phonics and reading to very young children.

Phonological awareness skills are important to develop good reading skills, which will help the child manipulate, segment, and blend sounds into words. Phonological awareness is a basis for reading.

Children begin to read by listening to others read aloud, then by recognising sounds in words, sounding words out for themselves, recognising familiar words, and so on. By engaging in wordplay, children learn to recognise patterns among words and use this knowledge to read and build words. Cutting words into “sound bites” e.g., oc /to/pus will help the child learn to read, while also helping with writing too.

I have experience working with children who make slower progress in reading and writing. I also have experience teaching children with processing and comprehension difficulties.

Children who have a limited vocabulary or a “word gap” are disadvantaged since this can impact their entire lives. This child will make slower progress in reading and writing, and consequently achieve lower results in tests. Reading is an important way for children to learn vocabulary. It is more likely that the child will hear and learn a new word by reading than they will in spoken language.

I am very experienced in working with students of all levels and abilities. I can quickly identify and consequently support any needs that impact a student's progress.

Some tactics to help your child with learning include:

  1. Encouraging your child to select the book they wish to read themselves.

  2. Encouraging your child to read widely in their spare time, as well as reading aloud.

  3. Talking to your child, but not over them, and trying to create fun with words.

  4. Allowing your child to play with language and sometimes get it wrong.

  5. Retelling the story together with your child to help them finish a comprehension task, or later write the story.

  6. Ensuring that your child is relaxed, enjoying themselves, and having fun with reading.


Children with better vocabulary have better reading comprehension, and their comprehension improves more over time.

I have the experience to help reluctant writers.

Why may a child be a reluctant writer?

  1. A child may have too many ideas. To streamline these ideas, it may be helpful to write them down and let the child choose the idea that they like the most.

  2. The child may not know how to get started with the writing task. If this is the case, use this framework: who, what, why, where, when, however, because, at the end. These keywords will help your child structure their writing.


Experience in teaching children with dyslexia.

Each child with dyslexia is different. Dyslexia often occurs with other Specific Learning Difficulties. Often we think that the needs of a child will be met in the classroom through high-quality teaching and differentiated learning materials. Unfortunately, most schools lack the resources to help these students. Dyslexia can be a challenge, but with effective teaching and good support, each child can and will achieve success and can shine.

One of the well-known consequences of dyslexia is a problem with reading and writing, but children with dyslexia may struggle with confidence. I believe that it is equally important is to help dyslexic learners develop confidence.

I believe that all teaching must be systematic and presented in a logical order from the easy to more difficult ideas. This will help the child gradually build their confidence and learning skills at the same time. It is important to teach the child how to simplify written instructions by highlighting important information. Giving each child enough time to process information is vital.

Experience in teaching children with dyscalculia.

A child can learn quicker when playing games. For example, when learning mathematics, hands-on multisensory methods relying on counters, number lines, sweets, and blocks may be used. By using tangible objects, you are making the maths more real and not too abstract. When discussing the maths task with your child, it is important to ask the child to explain the mathematical concept. If they can explain the concept back to you, then you will know whether the child understands the given mathematical task.

Experience in teaching children with  Autism/ ADHD/Dyspraxia.

Dyspraxia is a condition that impacts motor skills and means the child may have coordination difficulties when writing.

Children with dyspraxia will have a problem with balance, and spatial awareness. They may often struggle in school during gym, art classes, or have a problem with handwriting. Dyspraxia can impact attention and memory too. Sometimes the solution is simple. Listening to your child and supporting them is very important. When it comes to helping with handwriting, it might be good to use a wider type of pencil, apply a rubber grip, or, when the child is older, handwriting can be replaced with touch writing.

For children with ADHD, it is important to remain patient. Knowing a child’s strengths, interests and weaknesses is the first step to help them. Being positive, simple, clear, direct, and being able to repeat instructions is very important. The child may need extra time to complete their work. If possible, the activities should stay interactive.

Autism is a condition that impacts the way in which the child can see and understand the world around them. When I work with autistic children, I always refer to them by their first name so that they know who I am referring to. Autistic children may need extra time to understand what I have said and to react.

Children can often become easily frustrated, so we should always monitor their mood. They need plenty of opportunities to use their energy. Structure and routine are very important for reassuring the child that everything is planned and safe and this will help manage anxiety and stress. We need to remember to introduce any changes to routine and structure in advance to help a child prepare for what will happen next.

Experience working with anxiety and depression in children.

Anxiety may manifest as fear or worry, but can also make children irritable and angry. Symptoms of anxiety can also include trouble sleeping, as well as physical symptoms like fatigue, headaches, or stomach aches. Some anxious children keep their worries to themselves and so the symptoms can be missed.

Sometimes children are sad or feel powerless in their school life, and some children feel uninterested in things that they used to enjoy. When children feel persistent sadness and hopelessness, they may be diagnosed with depression.

 

My Teaching Philosophy

My teaching philosophy

Every day, children ask themselves: does the teacher see me and how do they see me? As a teacher, you are a significant person in the lives of the children you teach. What you say and what you do impacts your students greatly. The quality of the relationship you have with the child you teach is vital to their motivation to learn and do well.

Some of my ideas of effective teaching include:

  • Build a daily programme that functions best for the child.

  • Provide structure and routines that help manage stress and anxiety.

  • Accept that the child can have a bad day but motivate and engage them as quickly as you can.

  • Involve the child in taking a more active approach to learning.

  • Use revision techniques; this can be a powerful strategy.

  • Establish clear boundaries.

Something Sensational About Me

My approach to teaching is all about the child and their needs. By ensuring that my teaching is tailored to your child, I can help your child grow in confidence and develop their learning abilities.

There are many important things in my life but the most important thing for me is my family. We love books, music theatre, traveling, rugby, and many more.

Contact us to book this tutor

    Your contact details will be sent to SENsational Tutors Ltd and will NOT be used for any marketing purposes.

    Availability

    • Monday 11:30 - 18:00
    • Tuesday 11:30 - 18:00
    • Wednesday 9:00 - 18:00
    • Thursday 9:00 - 18:00
    • Friday 9:00 - 18:00

    Qualifications and Training

    Qualified Primary Teacher with QTS, Special Educational Needs specialist with Higher Degree, Masters' Degree in Education-Pedagogy, Postgraduate Diploma in Specific Language Difficulties, Montessori Teaching experience, Diploma of Social Work
    • Training Courses
      • Vocabulary Masterclass: helping disadvantaged children make rapid progress, with Shareen Wilkinson (July 2021)
      • Deeper Understanding: Creating a whole-school comprehension programme, with Rachel Clarke  (May 2021)
      • Lead
    ... Read More
    Qualified Primary Teacher with QTS, Special Educational Needs specialist with Higher Degree, Masters' Degree in Education-Pedagogy, Postgraduate Diploma in Specific Language Difficulties, Montessori Teaching experience, Diploma of Social Work
    • Training Courses
      • Vocabulary Masterclass: helping disadvantaged children make rapid progress, with Shareen Wilkinson (July 2021)
      • Deeper Understanding: Creating a whole-school comprehension programme, with Rachel Clarke  (May 2021)
      • Leading Literacy for Learning, with Rachel Clarke (January 2021)
      • Safeguarding Children Practice Level 3 (April 2018)
      • Supporting Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (November 2018)
      • Literacy in the Primary Classroom (November 2018)
      • New to Early Years Foundation Stage EYFS (October 2018)
      • Behaviour Basics – Getting off to a sure start in managing behaviour (September 2018)
      • Safeguarding; Keeping Children Safe in Education (September 2018)
      • Tradewind and Sanza Teaching Agency: Maths Learning Difficulties and Dyscalculia in Schools and Colleges with Steve Chin - September 2017
      • Mind Reading for Teachers; How to tell and What to do When Working memory isn’t Working with Jennie Guise (September 2017)
      • Study skills for Upper Primary and Secondary Schools Students with Bernadette McLean (September 2017)
      • Supporting Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (June 2017)
      • The Prevent duty (June 2017)
      • New to Early Years Foundation stage (May 2017)
      • EAL Learners in the Mainstream Classroom (April 2017)
      • Effective Questioning in the Classroom (April 2017)
      • Introduction to Special Education Needs and Disabilities (SEND), (April 2017)
      • SEND Communication Strategies (January 2017).
      • Teaching for Neurodiversity, Train the Trainer: Part 3 -Classroom support strategies (Primary), (January 2017).
      • Teaching for Neurodiversity, Train the Trainer: Part 2 – Understanding Neurodiversity (January 2017).
      • Teaching Phonics Effectively (January 2017).
      • Teaching for Neurodiversity, Train the Trainer: Part 1 – ‘Seeing the Whole Picture’ (January 2017).
      • The Education and Training Foundation Course - ‘Prevent for Practitioners’ (October 2016).
      • Female genital Mutilation: Recognising and Preventing FGM V1.3 (June 2016)
      • Dyslexia Action course on various strategies and resources to support pupils in the classroom and support other adults to support pupils with dyslexia (May 2015).
      • British Dyslexia Association workshop on Dealing with Dyscalculia (May 2014).
      • British Dyslexia Association course on Screening for Dyslexia (April 2014).
      • Helen Arkell Centre course on Understanding Dyslexia (April 2014).
      • British Dyslexia Association workshop on Practical Solutions for Dyslexia (January 2014).
      • Dyspraxia Foundation Conference on All Changes in Special Needs Sector (June 2013).
      • British Dyslexia Association workshop on Practical Solutions Plus-Reading (March 2013).
      • Hillingdon Autistic Care and Support on ‘Life and Learning with ASD’ and ‘I.T. with People with Social and Communication Difficulties’ (May 2008).
           

    Choose me if…

    • - you are looking for a qualified SEN teacher
    • – someone to put in boundaries
    • – a passionate and committed specialist teacher
    • – someone who is able to work flexibly
    • - someone who can make learning active and engaging

    SPECIFIC AREAS COVERED

    Watford, Ealing, Bushey, Northwood, Ruislip, Pinner, Elstree, Radlett, Stanmore, Harrow, Maida Vale, Chiswick, Fullam

    Location

    Enhanced DBS Checked

    References Checked

    ID Checked

    Contact us to book this tutor

      Your contact details will be sent to SENsational Tutors Ltd and will NOT be used for any marketing purposes.




      J A

      Longina came into my son's life when we lost all hope - he was demotivated and below average within his year group with some signs of learning difficulty that school teachers couldn’t properly address. She managed to turn things around within weeks! Most importantly she found a unique approach to him and taught him ways in which he was able to learn things in more efficient way and therefore make progress in class. I believe she was able to reignite that passion within and bring progress in his attitude to school work and to learning in general. She genuinely cares for him and ensures that she helps enough but also encourages independent work. In summary she is a great professional, my son adores her and we are incredibly lucky to have her in our lives as my son prepares for his 11+.

      J FM

      Every child should have a Longina in their lives; where many others had failed and given up, Longina was able to fully engage with our child and allow him to bloom beyond expectations. Our son had complex needs including a severe speech delay. Her innate passion for teaching coupled with her vast knowledge and experience helped him overcome many hurdles and shine again. She has had such a positive effect on him, including in his personal confidence, beyond academe - a real life changer. Longina's 'can do' attitude seems to be spurred by her wanting each child to achieve their maximum potential. Her patient, yet professional nurture, enabled our child to want to learn, something that no-one else had been able to do. We are beyond grateful to have had Longina in our lives and hope to be able to continue to have her for many more years to come! Longina has a unique gift and is, simply marvellous.

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