About Me

I am a qualified teacher with PGCE and QTS, a degree in Early Childhood Studies and a Masters in International Child Studies. Experience working with students who have autism including high-functioning autism, dyslexia, are non-verbal, have speech/ communication delay or difficulties, cerebral palsy, have complex needs, challenging behaviour, PMLD, ADHD/ ADD, anxiety, cognition and learning difficulties and dyscalculia. I am currently training to become a specialist teacher in Dyslexia.

£POA Per Hour

minimum 1.5 hour sessions

Specialist Experience and Skills

My experience developing trusting relationships with students with SEN and additional needs: I have over 10 years’ experience working with students with special educational needs (SEN). I believe that establishing a meaningful and trusting relationship with the student, family and other professionals is key. One of the strategies I utilise to support children and students with SEN and additional needs is repeating instructions and directions. Directions are difficult to process for many students with SEN as they require understanding and holding multiple pieces of information in working memo... Read More
My experience developing trusting relationships with students with SEN and additional needs: I have over 10 years’ experience working with students with special educational needs (SEN). I believe that establishing a meaningful and trusting relationship with the student, family and other professionals is key. One of the strategies I utilise to support children and students with SEN and additional needs is repeating instructions and directions. Directions are difficult to process for many students with SEN as they require understanding and holding multiple pieces of information in working memory, long enough for them to be acted upon. Not only is repetition key, but when possible involving multiple senses to help the child understand what is required. That means that I often support students by providing visual aids, reading directions aloud, showing charts and diagrams and even finished examples of work. Trying to juggle multiple pieces of information in students’ heads can greatly overwhelm SEND children. I like to use highlighters and colour coded pens or word maps to order a child’s thoughts and help them produce work that has a coherent structure and shows off their flair and potential. I like to try and make sure that there is space to calm down and move freely if things don’t go to plan. Thinking about what each child can do instead of focusing on what they can’t contribute.

My experience working with students with complex needs: some of the strategies I utilise when working with students with complex needs include: working at the child's pace, displaying a positive attitude, showing respect and dignity towards the child, giving the student the freedom to choose and have maximum control of the chosen activity. I find tactile cues such as gently touching a person’s shoulder, offering a blanket or other soft fabric, or providing silly putty are easy ways to mark a transition and get a child’s attention. I think it’s best that in the world of special needs, there is always a Plan B, and usually a Plan C.

My experience supporting students aged 16+ with additional and complex needs: I have taught children between the ages of 4 and 16 and I found that it was extremely important to build a rapport as much as I do with younger children. Working with young adults is different because they have reached maturity. It’s important therefore to find out their strengths and teach them the importance of communication skills.

My experience working with students who are non-verbal: I have experience creating and utilising communication boards with symbols and pictures to help structure the day. This strategy enables students who require routines and consistency to feel safe, secure and happy. Further, I have used basic Makaton and non-verbal communication strategies to communicate with children who are non-verbal. Knowing how to sign for essential items, for example food, drink and going to the toilet, and helping students to learn routines, are useful for children who find it difficult to communicate what they need.

My experience working with students with speech and language needs: I like to say the child’s name before asking questions or giving instructions so they know when to listen. I like to use visual cues (such as gestures and pictures, acting things out) to help students understand and remember information. Using simple sentences and short instructions will help the child understand and remember them. Further strategies I utilise include: checking to see if they have understood instructions or new information, giving the child time to find their words and express themselves, praising the child’s effort and acknowledging what they have to say, to support their confidence in speaking, and encouraging the child to communicate with you however they can using pointing and facial expressions.

My experience supporting students to transition to new schools and environments: I think it’s important to check what routines are already in place and which of the routines can be implemented when new environments are introduced. Continuing with an old routine can help mitigate stress on the child and help them transition to the new. Going on a tour of the new school or environment might help getting to grips with unfamiliar surroundings and help them adjust more quickly.

My experience teaching English (reading, writing, spelling): I like to teach children learning how to read and write from a specialist SEN or dyslexic perspective as this really helps to embed knowledge. Children with SEN require a lot of extra direct teaching of word patterns and phoneme symbols.  Because a person with SEN does not consistently “see” a word exactly the same every time they visually see it, their brains do not catalogue these patterns and phonemic symbols in the same way typical learners do. Therefore, they need lots of opportunities to see, hear and interact with words and language in a kinaesthetic way. I find pictorial representations to be very helpful, particularly when children are presented with abstract ideas in English. Writing stories that include strong characters, an interesting plot and good structure are helped using examples to illustrate the abstract idea. In addition, having a word count per paragraph helps children to write the required amount for each section of the story.

My experience teaching Maths: I have taught maths using tried and tested examples and getting children to manipulate the objects themselves to make their own observations and links. Short snippets of theory mixed with practical activities are best for experiencing maths first-hand. I like to incorporate all types of disciplines - children might make up a song about multiplication to learn their times tables.

My experience boosting confidence and self-esteem: Children who feel good about themselves have the confidence to try new things. They are more likely to try their best. They feel proud of what they can do. Self-esteem helps children cope with mistakes. It helps children try again, even if they fail at first. As a result, self-esteem helps children do better at school, at home, and with friends. I like to praise a child when they have done something well however small it might be - joining the line and resisting the urge to talk to their partner. I think praising children in private as well as in front of their peers helps children know that you are paying attention to them and you’re acknowledging their own small wins can make a world of difference to how children view themselves to the rest of the world.

My experience providing fun sessions to help students engage in learning: I believe that a classroom should be a safe and caring community where children are free to speak their minds and expand their horizons. I like to use a play-based approach to instil a lifelong love of learning. Making lessons fun and engaging ensures sustained motivation and builds resilience. I love the subjects that I teach, and I know how to make them come alive for my pupils.

My skills and experience supporting children to develop their independence: I believe that children who are given responsibilities in the classroom and school help to increase their independence. Regular appropriate tasks and asking children to complete the task that they believe is best for them is a simple technique to ensure that children take charge of their learning.

My specialist experience with autism: In my experience children with autism typically struggle with social skills and communication therefore it's imperative that their environment is not overloaded and that they can grasp the big picture of what they are learning. I optimise their learning experience by reducing unnecessary stimuli, maintaining structure and routine and encouraging a calm and positive environment in the classroom. I like to use lots of visuals to serve as quick and clear reminders about routines, rules, where things go and resources. It’s really important that autistic children hear concrete language rather than figurative as they tend to interpret language in concrete terms. Teaching social skills needs to be done in a direct way with modelling and discussing appropriate behaviour in easy to understand ways.

My Teaching Philosophy

I like to foster a positive learning environment, developing creative lessons that appeal to learners. I make short and long term goals focusing on the child’s ability to reach them and what that will look like. Sessions will be well planned and include next steps. I have an energetic manner well placed to meet the needs of all pupils.


I believe that a classroom should be a safe, caring community where children are free to speak their mind and blossom and grow. I like to use a play-based approach to instil a lifelong love of learning. Making lessons fun and engaging ensure sustained motivation and build resilience. I love the subjects that I teach, and I know how to make them come alive for my pupils. 

Something Sensational About Me

I went to drama school and I taught cooking for many years. I love using acting to help build story skills and watching chefs using crazy ingredients!

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    Availability

    • Monday 9am - 4pm
    • Tuesday 9am - 4pm
    • Wednesday 9am - 4pm
    • Thursday 9am - 4pm
    • Friday 9am - 6pm
    • Saturday 10am - 11am

    Qualifications and Training

    • PGCE - London Metropolitan University
    • Qualified Teacher Status
    • MA International Child Studies - King’s College, London
    • BA Hons Early Childhood Studies - Roehampton University 
    • Level 5 PATOSS Dyslexia Spld (ongoing) Diploma in Teaching Primary Learners with Specific Learning Difficulties.
    • Safeguarding Children in Education
    • Child Protection refresher
    • ... Read More
    • PGCE - London Metropolitan University
    • Qualified Teacher Status
    • MA International Child Studies - King’s College, London
    • BA Hons Early Childhood Studies - Roehampton University 
    • Level 5 PATOSS Dyslexia Spld (ongoing) Diploma in Teaching Primary Learners with Specific Learning Difficulties.
    • Safeguarding Children in Education
    • Child Protection refresher

    Choose me if…

    • You want your child to build confidence in themselves
    • You want to work with a teacher who’s knowledgeable, professional and thinks outside the box
    • You want a teacher who can engage SEN learners and those with Educational Needs
    • You want an experienced teacher with excellent spelling strategies
    • You want a teacher who loves English and knows how to make it come alive for pupils

    SPECIFIC AREAS COVERED

    London

    Location

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    Contact us to book this tutor

      Your contact details will be sent to SENsational Tutors Ltd and will NOT be used for any marketing purposes.




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